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Castles

You will never be far from a castle mighty walls of these fortresses have stood proud for many centuries, protecting notable historical figures from advancing armies.

Donnington Castle, Donnington, Berkshire

Donnington Castle, Donnington, Berkshire

Donnington Castle, Donnington, Berkshire the remains of medieval castle and gatehouse, built during the reign of Richard II. Before it was demolished in 1646, both King Henry VIII and Queen Elizabeth I visited the castle. all that remains of Donnington Castle today is its gatehouse and scattered earthworks. Free open access at any reasonable time.

Ludgershall Castle, Ludgershall, Wiltshire

Ludgershall Castle, Ludgershall, Wiltshire

Remains of 12th-century fortified royal residence, built in the late 11th century. The castle is surrounded by earthwork banks and ditches. In 1210 King John strengthened the castle and improved the living quarters. John's son, Henry III, completed the transformation into a comfortable royal residence and hunting lodge. The castle gradually fell out of use, and by 1540. Free open access at any reasonable time.

Oxford Castle, Oxford Castle

Oxford Castle, Oxford Castle

Large, partly ruined Norman medieval castle. Built in 1071. Much of the castle was destroyed by Parliamentary forces during the English Civil War, with the remaining buildings used as Oxford's local gaol. The medieval remains of the castle, including the motte and St George's Tower have been preserved. Restricted opening times and entrance charges apply.

Farnham Castle Keep, Farnham, Surrey

Farnham Castle Keep, Farnham, Surrey

Remains of 12th century castle, built in 1138. Following The Anarchy, the original motte and bailey castle was demolished by Henry II in 1155 and rebuilt again in the late 12th century. The castle was slighted again after the English Civil War in 1648 and the keep abandoned, but much-altered parts of the medieval bishops' residence remain. Free open access at any reasonable time.

Wolvesey Castle, Winchester, Hampshire

Wolvesey Castle, Winchester, Hampshire

Ruins of 12th-century bishops palace, built between 1130 and 1140. Once a very important building, in July 1554 it hosted the wedding breakfast of Queen Mary and Philip II of Spain before they left for the wedding ceremony at nearby Winchester Cathedral. Destroyed by the Parliamentarians during the English Civil War in 1646, the chapel is the only considerable remnant of the original castle. The chapel and castle remains were incorporated into the 'new' bishop's palace which was built in 1684. Free and open access at any reasonable time during summer months.

Farleigh Hungerford Castle, Hungerford, Somerset

Farleigh Hungerford Castle, Hungerford, Somerset

Remains of 14th century castle, built between 1377 and 1383. At the outbreak of the English Civil War in 1642, the castle was held by Sir Edward Hungerford, a leader of Parliamentary forces in Wiltshire. The castle escaped slighting as a consequence of this. The last of the Hungerfords to hold the castle, another Sir Edward, was forced to sell the property in 1686 in order to settle his gambling debts. By the 18th century the uninhabited castle had fallen into disrepair. Restricted opening times and entrance charges apply.

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